Supporting Your Teen in “Adulting”--Tips for Parenting Your Teen and Teaching Them How To Be Independent

The transition from being a teenager to becoming a young adult can be one of the most difficult times in our lives. Not only is it challenging for teens, but parenting your teen can also be scary for you as a parent or caretaker. With so much happening in such a short window of time, it’s reasonable to feel overwhelmed.

Moving Upstream: How To Engage Teens in Preventing ACEs

If we want to prevent a child from experiencing adverse childhood experiences, intervening  before our next generation of children is conceived may be a good idea. By empowering today’s teens to make healthier choices for tomorrow’s families, we can take an upstream approach to prevent child maltreatment. (Guest Blogger Randi Rubenstein from Educate Tomorrow’s Parents)

10 Travel Tips for Traveling with Kids this Summer

Now that the kids are out of school and summer is in full swing, you might be thinking about vacation travel plans. Whether you’re hitting the road over the river and through the woods to see relatives or taking to the air, traveling with kids always brings extra challenges.


As much fun as it is to experience new adventures through the eyes of your children, stress and strain can put a damper on things both for you and your little ones. But planning ahead and taking a little time to prepare can help everyone focus on creating happy memories instead of losing their composure. Let’s look at some of the top travel trips from parenting and travel experts.

Tips for Supporting Children Through Domestic Abuse

When you’re a parent in an abusive or unhealthy relationship, a tough situation is even more complicated. Not only must you consider your own safety, you also need to consider what’s best for your child.


Also, being a witness to domestic or dating violence can have a long-lasting impact on children, physically, emotionally, and socially. But you can take control by helping your children develop resiliency. Continue reading for tips on what you can do and if you’re involved in an unhealthy or abusive relationship, remember help is available.

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. Here’s How You Can Get Involved

To better understand the national conversation around child abuse prevention, let’s look at some of the biggest milestones we’ve passed. Even as we acknowledge our successes in this area we are mindful of the need for additional progress and continue to think about how we can play a role in parent support, advocating for children, and promoting education around protective factors.

The Durham Integrated Domestic Violence Response System: Building Community Commitment in Durham

There is no doubt that community and neighborhood involvement plays a crucial role in ensuring the safety and well-being of children. When families struggle, parents experience stress. And when parents do not know where to turn for support, stress can reach crisis levels.

Fortunately, making families aware of community resources that can relieve some of the biggest sources of stress, can make a difference. Durham has developed beneficial services, strategies, and advocacy to support Durham families. However, many families who want help don’t know where to turn and coordination among the offices making services available could be improved.

Durham Board of County Commissioners Passes ACEs Community Resilience Plan

Durham, North Carolina, is a vibrant community that is rapidly growing and changing. It’s also a diverse community. Children in Durham come from a wide variety of ethnic, racial, and national backgrounds. This diversity is a beautiful thing because it contributes to the rich cultural tapestry that makes Durham such a special place to work and live, but it also poses problems.

Supporting Domestic Violence Victims with Proven Methods

Supporting Domestic Violence Victims with Proven Methods

Jessica was referred to Exchange Family Center’s Parenting of Adolescents (POA) program to receive support improving her relationship with her mother (Jane) and addressing the emotional distress they both witnessed/experienced while living with domestic violence. Out family therapists helped this mother-daughter duo sort through a lot of emotions and an extensive domestic violence history.